Forest

Forest Farming 

Non-Timber Forest Products

The suite of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) is quite vast but is contingent upon regional

climate and forest type. These videos are meant to provide detailed information on a variety

of NTFPs, including their natural ecosystem, methods of propagation, and harvest times. 

           Forest Farming Webinar          Edibles          Medicinals           Syrups          

 

Craft & Decorations        Seeds & Plant Stock        Other NTFPs

We have over 150 forest farming videos! Be sure to check out & subscribe to our YouTube channel.

 

Forest Farming Webinars

Non-timber Forest Product 2014 Webinar Series

 
Forest Trees

Forest Farming Edibles

Forest Farming Fiddlehead Ferns Series  (7 videos)


Ostrich fern fiddleheads come up in early spring when forsythia and daffodils begin to bloom. This video series takes a look at where ostrich fern fiddleheads grow, when to harvest them and how to identify them. We discuss the importance of sustainable harvest and proper cleaning and cooking of fiddlehead ferns before consumption. Finally, we take a look at Farmington Maine’s Fiddlehead Fern Festival and explore NorCliff Farms, the largest ostrich fiddlehead fern producer and distributor in North America. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




Forest Farming Ramps Series (6 videos)


Spring is the time to plant ramps, a popular forest vegetable in the eastern United States. This savory plant is a member of the onion family and is closely related to leeks. In early spring, ramps send up smooth, broad, lily-of-the-valley like leaves that disappear by summer before the white flowers appear. The whole plant is edible, has a garlic-like aroma, and is usually three or more years old when harvested. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




What are edible NTFPs?


"Forest edibles" are non-timber forest products (NTFPs) that are considered edible, and can be sold on a local market. While a bit different from traditional gardens and typical agriculture practices, the forest can host many edible plants, and sometimes in great quantities! In the Appalachians, one of the best known (and infamous) wild forest edibles is Ramps! Ramps grow wild in the forest, and because they are perennial and spread by roots and seeds, can sometimes form vast patches under the forest canopy. With ramps, as with all wild species, stewardship and sustainable harvest are the keys to ensuring a happy harvest and profitable future. Harvesting wild food plants to sell & market is also a little different from a typical garden harvest, and can vary from one species to another. In general, these are some good starter guidelines: 1. Make sure to have a correct identification on what you are harvesting. (Look-alikes do exist: i.e some wild edible mushrooms and ramps have toxic look-alikes.) 2. Have a large population (or multiple populations) to harvest from, to ensure sustainability, and, as always, harvest responsibly. All species are different and need special consideration. 3. Create and keep to a good post-harvest process. Best practices and food safety requirements should always be at the forefront. Washing, drying or fresh handling all have slightly different requirements. (This is especially important with mushrooms! Many states now require a state license to harvest wild mushrooms for commercial sale to restaurants.) 4. Keep learning! Learn more about the species you are harvesting, learn more about harvest methods, preservation or value-added products, and learn about your market! Keep a journal and note down your observations and process, connect with other forest farmers, etc! A few common forest edibles: Ramps Fiddlehead Ferns Nettles Watercress Wasabi (non-native) Wild Edible Mushrooms Other edible forest products Forest-farmed Mushrooms Honey




Mushrooms Using Totems & Woodchips Series   (6 videos)


Grow your own oyster and lion’s mane mushrooms using totems and incorporate wood chip beds beneath your forest canopy or in your garden to grow stropharia, also known as red wine cap mushrooms. Oyster mushrooms are easy to grow on tulip poplar, willow, cotton wood, and box elder while lion’s mane cultivation requires sugar maple or American beech totems. This video series provides simple step-by-step instructions on how to assemble and inoculate your totems and wood chip beds.




Forest Farming Wasabi Series  (6 videos)


Wasabi was traditionally eaten with sushi due to it’s ability to calm food poisoning that used to occur with eating raw fish. Today, real wasabi is expensive and therefore difficult to find in restaurants. Joe Hollis, founder of Mountain Gardens, explains how to collect wasabi seeds, plant them, produce new plants through rhizomes and finally, how to harvest wasabi. We discuss the differences between seed-grown wasabi and wasabi cultivated through tissue cultures. Hollis explains the difference between Japanese varieties and cultivation and American varieties. Wasabi roots can be grated fresh and the leaves can be consumed as well. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




Forest Farming Shiitake Mushroom Series   (10 videos)


Dr. Kenneth Mudge with Cornell University’s Department of Horticulture reviews the stages of shiitake log preparation, inoculation, resting positions, shocking and harvesting. Every step of the process, including site evaluation, is thoroughly explained so that you will have all of the knowledge necessary to forest farm shiitake mushrooms at home.




Bee Keeping Series (10 videos)


Jon Christie, owner of Wild Mountain Bees, takes us through the steps of bee keeping in this video series. We discuss everything from hive placement to honey collection. Jon removes several frames from the hive to find the queen and shows us the difference between comb filled with brood and capped comb filled with honey. Bees kept on the edge of Appalachian hardwood forests can greatly benefit from the vast amounts of nectar found in tulip poplar, sour wood, and locust blooms. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST





 

Forest Farming Medicinals

What are forest farmed medicinals?


COMING SOON! CHECK BACK LATER




Forest Farming Goldenseal Series (6 videos)


Herbalist Ben Kitchen explains what goldenseal is, where it grows best and how to plant it in the forest. Goldenseal is valued for its potent medicinal properties. It is ingested and used as a topical agent for its antimicrobial properties. Goldenseal can be propagated through rhizome division, seeds and fibers. VIEW FULL GOLDENSEAL PLAYLIST (6 VIDEOS)




Forest Farming Ginseng Series   (5 videos)


Ginseng expert, Bob Beyfuss, explains the different varieties of ginseng, how each variety is grown and the resulting value. We take a look at the forest types that ginseng prefers and note the herbaceous perennials that indicate whether the site is beneficial for growing ginseng or not. Bob explains how ginseng is planted in a wild-simulated situation and we take a look at the life cycle of ginseng. VIEW FULL GINSENG PLAYLIST (5 VIDEOS)




Forest Farming Medicinal & Decorative Plants for Market Sale   (6 videos)


Growing forest medicinal and decorative plants as nursery stock for market sale can often be more profitable than selling just the root. We take a look at the process of growing and transplanting seedlings for market sale with Robert Eidus, owner of Eagle Feather Organic Farm, and we review the importance of knowing your market and creating a business plan beforehand. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




Methods of Ginseng Seed Collection & Stratification   (3 videos)


Forest farmer, Dave Carmen, demonstrates some innovative ways to protect seed from mice, turkeys and insects. He experiments with ginseng plants that send up ripe seed berries early. By separating early seed from stratification with seed that ripens later in the season, he was able to bypass an entire year of the stratification process. Early seed was planted immediately and germinated the following spring instead of two springs later. Dave demonstrates the stratification process with ginseng seed which helps to protect the seed over the course of the first winter. By burying the seed with sand in a mesh bag, the seed stays moist and protected until the following year when it is dug up and washed for planting.





 
Forest Trees

Forest Farming Crafts & Decor

What kind of decorative & handcraft things can be grown?





Forest Products as Art – Making a Pine Needle Basket (5 videos)


Long leaf pine needles are the most prized when it comes to weaving pine needle baskets. The long leaf pine tree is typically found in the Southeast from the east coast of North Carolina to the Florida’s Gulf coast. Nancy Basket walks us through the steps of constructing a pine needle basket in this series. She instructs viewers to remember the term, “feed the end,” which refers to the feeding of more needles into the tail of the needles forming the basket. The long leaf pine needles require less feeding and are used more often in basketry because of this.





 

Forest Farming Syrups

 

Forest Farming Fiddlehead Ferns Series  (7 videos)


Ostrich fern fiddleheads come up in early spring when forsythia and daffodils begin to bloom. This video series takes a look at where ostrich fern fiddleheads grow, when to harvest them and how to identify them. We discuss the importance of sustainable harvest and proper cleaning and cooking of fiddlehead ferns before consumption. Finally, we take a look at Farmington Maine’s Fiddlehead Fern Festival and explore NorCliff Farms, the largest ostrich fiddlehead fern producer and distributor in North America. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




Forest Farming Ramps Series (6 videos)


Spring is the time to plant ramps, a popular forest vegetable in the eastern United States. This savory plant is a member of the onion family and is closely related to leeks. In early spring, ramps send up smooth, broad, lily-of-the-valley like leaves that disappear by summer before the white flowers appear. The whole plant is edible, has a garlic-like aroma, and is usually three or more years old when harvested. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




What are edible NTFPs?


"Forest edibles" are non-timber forest products (NTFPs) that are considered edible, and can be sold on a local market. While a bit different from traditional gardens and typical agriculture practices, the forest can host many edible plants, and sometimes in great quantities! In the Appalachians, one of the best known (and infamous) wild forest edibles is Ramps! Ramps grow wild in the forest, and because they are perennial and spread by roots and seeds, can sometimes form vast patches under the forest canopy. With ramps, as with all wild species, stewardship and sustainable harvest are the keys to ensuring a happy harvest and profitable future. Harvesting wild food plants to sell & market is also a little different from a typical garden harvest, and can vary from one species to another. In general, these are some good starter guidelines: 1. Make sure to have a correct identification on what you are harvesting. (Look-alikes do exist: i.e some wild edible mushrooms and ramps have toxic look-alikes.) 2. Have a large population (or multiple populations) to harvest from, to ensure sustainability, and, as always, harvest responsibly. All species are different and need special consideration. 3. Create and keep to a good post-harvest process. Best practices and food safety requirements should always be at the forefront. Washing, drying or fresh handling all have slightly different requirements. (This is especially important with mushrooms! Many states now require a state license to harvest wild mushrooms for commercial sale to restaurants.) 4. Keep learning! Learn more about the species you are harvesting, learn more about harvest methods, preservation or value-added products, and learn about your market! Keep a journal and note down your observations and process, connect with other forest farmers, etc! A few common forest edibles: Ramps Fiddlehead Ferns Nettles Watercress Wasabi (non-native) Wild Edible Mushrooms Other edible forest products Forest-farmed Mushrooms Honey




Mushrooms Using Totems & Woodchips Series   (6 videos)


Grow your own oyster and lion’s mane mushrooms using totems and incorporate wood chip beds beneath your forest canopy or in your garden to grow stropharia, also known as red wine cap mushrooms. Oyster mushrooms are easy to grow on tulip poplar, willow, cotton wood, and box elder while lion’s mane cultivation requires sugar maple or American beech totems. This video series provides simple step-by-step instructions on how to assemble and inoculate your totems and wood chip beds.




Forest Farming Wasabi Series  (6 videos)


Wasabi was traditionally eaten with sushi due to it’s ability to calm food poisoning that used to occur with eating raw fish. Today, real wasabi is expensive and therefore difficult to find in restaurants. Joe Hollis, founder of Mountain Gardens, explains how to collect wasabi seeds, plant them, produce new plants through rhizomes and finally, how to harvest wasabi. We discuss the differences between seed-grown wasabi and wasabi cultivated through tissue cultures. Hollis explains the difference between Japanese varieties and cultivation and American varieties. Wasabi roots can be grated fresh and the leaves can be consumed as well. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




Forest Farming Shiitake Mushroom Series   (10 videos)


Dr. Kenneth Mudge with Cornell University’s Department of Horticulture reviews the stages of shiitake log preparation, inoculation, resting positions, shocking and harvesting. Every step of the process, including site evaluation, is thoroughly explained so that you will have all of the knowledge necessary to forest farm shiitake mushrooms at home.




Bee Keeping Series (10 videos)


Jon Christie, owner of Wild Mountain Bees, takes us through the steps of bee keeping in this video series. We discuss everything from hive placement to honey collection. Jon removes several frames from the hive to find the queen and shows us the difference between comb filled with brood and capped comb filled with honey. Bees kept on the edge of Appalachian hardwood forests can greatly benefit from the vast amounts of nectar found in tulip poplar, sour wood, and locust blooms. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST





Forest Trees

Forest Farming Seeds & Plant Stock

Forest Farming Fiddlehead Ferns Series  (7 videos)


Ostrich fern fiddleheads come up in early spring when forsythia and daffodils begin to bloom. This video series takes a look at where ostrich fern fiddleheads grow, when to harvest them and how to identify them. We discuss the importance of sustainable harvest and proper cleaning and cooking of fiddlehead ferns before consumption. Finally, we take a look at Farmington Maine’s Fiddlehead Fern Festival and explore NorCliff Farms, the largest ostrich fiddlehead fern producer and distributor in North America. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




Forest Farming Ramps Series (6 videos)


Spring is the time to plant ramps, a popular forest vegetable in the eastern United States. This savory plant is a member of the onion family and is closely related to leeks. In early spring, ramps send up smooth, broad, lily-of-the-valley like leaves that disappear by summer before the white flowers appear. The whole plant is edible, has a garlic-like aroma, and is usually three or more years old when harvested. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




What are edible NTFPs?


"Forest edibles" are non-timber forest products (NTFPs) that are considered edible, and can be sold on a local market. While a bit different from traditional gardens and typical agriculture practices, the forest can host many edible plants, and sometimes in great quantities! In the Appalachians, one of the best known (and infamous) wild forest edibles is Ramps! Ramps grow wild in the forest, and because they are perennial and spread by roots and seeds, can sometimes form vast patches under the forest canopy. With ramps, as with all wild species, stewardship and sustainable harvest are the keys to ensuring a happy harvest and profitable future. Harvesting wild food plants to sell & market is also a little different from a typical garden harvest, and can vary from one species to another. In general, these are some good starter guidelines: 1. Make sure to have a correct identification on what you are harvesting. (Look-alikes do exist: i.e some wild edible mushrooms and ramps have toxic look-alikes.) 2. Have a large population (or multiple populations) to harvest from, to ensure sustainability, and, as always, harvest responsibly. All species are different and need special consideration. 3. Create and keep to a good post-harvest process. Best practices and food safety requirements should always be at the forefront. Washing, drying or fresh handling all have slightly different requirements. (This is especially important with mushrooms! Many states now require a state license to harvest wild mushrooms for commercial sale to restaurants.) 4. Keep learning! Learn more about the species you are harvesting, learn more about harvest methods, preservation or value-added products, and learn about your market! Keep a journal and note down your observations and process, connect with other forest farmers, etc! A few common forest edibles: Ramps Fiddlehead Ferns Nettles Watercress Wasabi (non-native) Wild Edible Mushrooms Other edible forest products Forest-farmed Mushrooms Honey




Mushrooms Using Totems & Woodchips Series   (6 videos)


Grow your own oyster and lion’s mane mushrooms using totems and incorporate wood chip beds beneath your forest canopy or in your garden to grow stropharia, also known as red wine cap mushrooms. Oyster mushrooms are easy to grow on tulip poplar, willow, cotton wood, and box elder while lion’s mane cultivation requires sugar maple or American beech totems. This video series provides simple step-by-step instructions on how to assemble and inoculate your totems and wood chip beds.




Forest Farming Wasabi Series  (6 videos)


Wasabi was traditionally eaten with sushi due to it’s ability to calm food poisoning that used to occur with eating raw fish. Today, real wasabi is expensive and therefore difficult to find in restaurants. Joe Hollis, founder of Mountain Gardens, explains how to collect wasabi seeds, plant them, produce new plants through rhizomes and finally, how to harvest wasabi. We discuss the differences between seed-grown wasabi and wasabi cultivated through tissue cultures. Hollis explains the difference between Japanese varieties and cultivation and American varieties. Wasabi roots can be grated fresh and the leaves can be consumed as well. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




Forest Farming Shiitake Mushroom Series   (10 videos)


Dr. Kenneth Mudge with Cornell University’s Department of Horticulture reviews the stages of shiitake log preparation, inoculation, resting positions, shocking and harvesting. Every step of the process, including site evaluation, is thoroughly explained so that you will have all of the knowledge necessary to forest farm shiitake mushrooms at home.




Bee Keeping Series (10 videos)


Jon Christie, owner of Wild Mountain Bees, takes us through the steps of bee keeping in this video series. We discuss everything from hive placement to honey collection. Jon removes several frames from the hive to find the queen and shows us the difference between comb filled with brood and capped comb filled with honey. Bees kept on the edge of Appalachian hardwood forests can greatly benefit from the vast amounts of nectar found in tulip poplar, sour wood, and locust blooms. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST





 

Other Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs)

What are forest farmed medicinals?


COMING SOON! CHECK BACK LATER




Forest Farming Goldenseal Series (6 videos)


Herbalist Ben Kitchen explains what goldenseal is, where it grows best and how to plant it in the forest. Goldenseal is valued for its potent medicinal properties. It is ingested and used as a topical agent for its antimicrobial properties. Goldenseal can be propagated through rhizome division, seeds and fibers. VIEW FULL GOLDENSEAL PLAYLIST (6 VIDEOS)




Forest Farming Ginseng Series   (5 videos)


Ginseng expert, Bob Beyfuss, explains the different varieties of ginseng, how each variety is grown and the resulting value. We take a look at the forest types that ginseng prefers and note the herbaceous perennials that indicate whether the site is beneficial for growing ginseng or not. Bob explains how ginseng is planted in a wild-simulated situation and we take a look at the life cycle of ginseng. VIEW FULL GINSENG PLAYLIST (5 VIDEOS)




Forest Farming Medicinal & Decorative Plants for Market Sale   (6 videos)


Growing forest medicinal and decorative plants as nursery stock for market sale can often be more profitable than selling just the root. We take a look at the process of growing and transplanting seedlings for market sale with Robert Eidus, owner of Eagle Feather Organic Farm, and we review the importance of knowing your market and creating a business plan beforehand. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




Methods of Ginseng Seed Collection & Stratification   (3 videos)


Forest farmer, Dave Carmen, demonstrates some innovative ways to protect seed from mice, turkeys and insects. He experiments with ginseng plants that send up ripe seed berries early. By separating early seed from stratification with seed that ripens later in the season, he was able to bypass an entire year of the stratification process. Early seed was planted immediately and germinated the following spring instead of two springs later. Dave demonstrates the stratification process with ginseng seed which helps to protect the seed over the course of the first winter. By burying the seed with sand in a mesh bag, the seed stays moist and protected until the following year when it is dug up and washed for planting.





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