Forest

Forest Farming 

Non-Timber Forest Products

The suite of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) is quite vast but is contingent upon regional

climate and forest type. These videos are meant to provide detailed information on a variety

of NTFPs, including their natural ecosystem, methods of propagation, and harvest times. 

           Forest Farming Webinar          Edibles          Medicinals           Syrups          

 

Craft & Decorations        Seeds & Plant Stock        Other NTFPs

We have over 150 forest farming videos! Be sure to check out & subscribe to our YouTube channel.

 

Forest Farming Webinars

Non-timber Forest Product 2014 Webinar Series

 
Forest Trees

Forest Farming Edibles

Forest Farming Fiddlehead Ferns Series  (7 videos)


Ostrich fern fiddleheads come up in early spring when forsythia and daffodils begin to bloom. This video series takes a look at where ostrich fern fiddleheads grow, when to harvest them and how to identify them. We discuss the importance of sustainable harvest and proper cleaning and cooking of fiddlehead ferns before consumption. Finally, we take a look at Farmington Maine’s Fiddlehead Fern Festival and explore NorCliff Farms, the largest ostrich fiddlehead fern producer and distributor in North America. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




Forest Farming Ramps Series (6 videos)


Spring is the time to plant ramps, a popular forest vegetable in the eastern United States. This savory plant is a member of the onion family and is closely related to leeks. In early spring, ramps send up smooth, broad, lily-of-the-valley like leaves that disappear by summer before the white flowers appear. The whole plant is edible, has a garlic-like aroma, and is usually three or more years old when harvested. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




What are edible NTFPs?


"Forest edibles" are non-timber forest products (NTFPs) that are considered edible, and can be sold on a local market. While a bit different from traditional gardens and typical agriculture practices, the forest can host many edible plants, and sometimes in great quantities! In the Appalachians, one of the best known (and infamous) wild forest edibles is Ramps! Ramps grow wild in the forest, and because they are perennial and spread by roots and seeds, can sometimes form vast patches under the forest canopy. With ramps, as with all wild species, stewardship and sustainable harvest are the keys to ensuring a happy harvest and profitable future. Harvesting wild food plants to sell & market is also a little different from a typical garden harvest, and can vary from one species to another. In general, these are some good starter guidelines: 1. Make sure to have a correct identification on what you are harvesting. (Look-alikes do exist: i.e some wild edible mushrooms and ramps have toxic look-alikes.) 2. Have a large population (or multiple populations) to harvest from, to ensure sustainability, and, as always, harvest responsibly. All species are different and need special consideration. 3. Create and keep to a good post-harvest process. Best practices and food safety requirements should always be at the forefront. Washing, drying or fresh handling all have slightly different requirements. (This is especially important with mushrooms! Many states now require a state license to harvest wild mushrooms for commercial sale to restaurants.) 4. Keep learning! Learn more about the species you are harvesting, learn more about harvest methods, preservation or value-added products, and learn about your market! Keep a journal and note down your observations and process, connect with other forest farmers, etc! A few common forest edibles: Ramps Fiddlehead Ferns Nettles Watercress Wasabi (non-native) Wild Edible Mushrooms Other edible forest products Forest-farmed Mushrooms Honey




Mushrooms Using Totems & Woodchips Series   (6 videos)


Grow your own oyster and lion’s mane mushrooms using totems and incorporate wood chip beds beneath your forest canopy or in your garden to grow stropharia, also known as red wine cap mushrooms. Oyster mushrooms are easy to grow on tulip poplar, willow, cotton wood, and box elder while lion’s mane cultivation requires sugar maple or American beech totems. This video series provides simple step-by-step instructions on how to assemble and inoculate your totems and wood chip beds.




Forest Farming Wasabi Series  (6 videos)


Wasabi was traditionally eaten with sushi due to it’s ability to calm food poisoning that used to occur with eating raw fish. Today, real wasabi is expensive and therefore difficult to find in restaurants. Joe Hollis, founder of Mountain Gardens, explains how to collect wasabi seeds, plant them, produce new plants through rhizomes and finally, how to harvest wasabi. We discuss the differences between seed-grown wasabi and wasabi cultivated through tissue cultures. Hollis explains the difference between Japanese varieties and cultivation and American varieties. Wasabi roots can be grated fresh and the leaves can be consumed as well. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST




Forest Farming Shiitake Mushroom Series   (10 videos)


Dr. Kenneth Mudge with Cornell University’s Department of Horticulture reviews the stages of shiitake log preparation, inoculation, resting positions, shocking and harvesting. Every step of the process, including site evaluation, is thoroughly explained so that you will have all of the knowledge necessary to forest farm shiitake mushrooms at home.




Bee Keeping Series (10 videos)


Jon Christie, owner of Wild Mountain Bees, takes us through the steps of bee keeping in this video series. We discuss everything from hive placement to honey collection. Jon removes several frames from the hive to find the queen and shows us the difference between comb filled with brood and capped comb filled with honey. Bees kept on the edge of Appalachian hardwood forests can greatly benefit from the vast amounts of nectar found in tulip poplar, sour wood, and locust blooms. VIEW FULL PLAYLIST





 

Forest Farming Medicinals

What kind of trees can be tapped for syrup?





Forest Farming Maple Syrup on a Small Scale (3 videos)


Steve Caccamo, President of Next Generation Maple Products, demonstrates maple sugaring for the backyard maple hobbyist. In this short series, we take a look at small-scale sap collection and evaporation. Steve collects sap from trees that are only a few miles from his home. After transporting the sap with his trailer, he boils it down in an evaporator in his backyard.




Forest Farming Maple Syrup on a Large Scale (12 videos)


Cornell University’s Director of the Uihlein Forest, Michael Farrell, takes us through the sugaring process step by step. First, we identify a sugar maple tree, then move to tapping and collecting the sap in three different ways. Michael explains the techniques and new technologies of large-scale sugaring operations all while delivering information that is valuable to a sugaring production on any scale. We finish this series with a look at tap hole maple, a previously undervalued forest product that is gaining new recognition for its exhibition of the character and stories behind the sugaring process.




Reverse Osmosis Process for Maple Syrup Production (5 videos)


Cornell University’s Maple Specialist, Steve Childs, explains the process of using reverse osmosis membranes with maple syrup production. Reverse osmosis membranes allow certain particles to pass through them while denying other particles. By putting maple sap under pressure and forcing it through the membrane, water molecules go through and are removed from the system while sugar molecules are left behind and are ejected back into the sap container. The sap is run through repeatedly and more water is removed with each pass through the RO membrane. The end result is concentrated sap that is then boiled in the evaporator until the sugar content reaches a minimum of 66 Brix (or percent) at 60 degrees Fahrenheit.




Forest Farming Walnut Syrup (5 videos)


Mike Farrell, Cornell University’s maple specialist, points out the characteristics of walnut trees and demonstrates the tapping process. Unlike maple trees which are composed predominately of white sapwood, walnut trees quickly turn their sapwood into heartwood. Walnut trees can therefore be tapped at a younger age, before the sapwood turns to heartwood and diminishes the amount of sap that can be collected. Other differences between the two species are in the sap itself. Walnut sap has more pectin in it which makes it difficult to filter. It is also suggested that people with nut allergies should avoid walnut syrup until further research can be conducted on whether or not those allergenic properties are denatured during the boiling process.





 
Forest Trees

Forest Farming Crafts & Decor

What kind of trees can be tapped for syrup?





Forest Farming Maple Syrup on a Small Scale (3 videos)


Steve Caccamo, President of Next Generation Maple Products, demonstrates maple sugaring for the backyard maple hobbyist. In this short series, we take a look at small-scale sap collection and evaporation. Steve collects sap from trees that are only a few miles from his home. After transporting the sap with his trailer, he boils it down in an evaporator in his backyard.




Forest Farming Maple Syrup on a Large Scale (12 videos)


Cornell University’s Director of the Uihlein Forest, Michael Farrell, takes us through the sugaring process step by step. First, we identify a sugar maple tree, then move to tapping and collecting the sap in three different ways. Michael explains the techniques and new technologies of large-scale sugaring operations all while delivering information that is valuable to a sugaring production on any scale. We finish this series with a look at tap hole maple, a previously undervalued forest product that is gaining new recognition for its exhibition of the character and stories behind the sugaring process.




Reverse Osmosis Process for Maple Syrup Production (5 videos)


Cornell University’s Maple Specialist, Steve Childs, explains the process of using reverse osmosis membranes with maple syrup production. Reverse osmosis membranes allow certain particles to pass through them while denying other particles. By putting maple sap under pressure and forcing it through the membrane, water molecules go through and are removed from the system while sugar molecules are left behind and are ejected back into the sap container. The sap is run through repeatedly and more water is removed with each pass through the RO membrane. The end result is concentrated sap that is then boiled in the evaporator until the sugar content reaches a minimum of 66 Brix (or percent) at 60 degrees Fahrenheit.




Forest Farming Walnut Syrup (5 videos)


Mike Farrell, Cornell University’s maple specialist, points out the characteristics of walnut trees and demonstrates the tapping process. Unlike maple trees which are composed predominately of white sapwood, walnut trees quickly turn their sapwood into heartwood. Walnut trees can therefore be tapped at a younger age, before the sapwood turns to heartwood and diminishes the amount of sap that can be collected. Other differences between the two species are in the sap itself. Walnut sap has more pectin in it which makes it difficult to filter. It is also suggested that people with nut allergies should avoid walnut syrup until further research can be conducted on whether or not those allergenic properties are denatured during the boiling process.





 

Forest Farming Syrups

 

What kind of trees can be tapped for syrup?





Forest Farming Maple Syrup on a Small Scale (3 videos)


Steve Caccamo, President of Next Generation Maple Products, demonstrates maple sugaring for the backyard maple hobbyist. In this short series, we take a look at small-scale sap collection and evaporation. Steve collects sap from trees that are only a few miles from his home. After transporting the sap with his trailer, he boils it down in an evaporator in his backyard.




Forest Farming Maple Syrup on a Large Scale (12 videos)


Cornell University’s Director of the Uihlein Forest, Michael Farrell, takes us through the sugaring process step by step. First, we identify a sugar maple tree, then move to tapping and collecting the sap in three different ways. Michael explains the techniques and new technologies of large-scale sugaring operations all while delivering information that is valuable to a sugaring production on any scale. We finish this series with a look at tap hole maple, a previously undervalued forest product that is gaining new recognition for its exhibition of the character and stories behind the sugaring process.




Reverse Osmosis Process for Maple Syrup Production (5 videos)


Cornell University’s Maple Specialist, Steve Childs, explains the process of using reverse osmosis membranes with maple syrup production. Reverse osmosis membranes allow certain particles to pass through them while denying other particles. By putting maple sap under pressure and forcing it through the membrane, water molecules go through and are removed from the system while sugar molecules are left behind and are ejected back into the sap container. The sap is run through repeatedly and more water is removed with each pass through the RO membrane. The end result is concentrated sap that is then boiled in the evaporator until the sugar content reaches a minimum of 66 Brix (or percent) at 60 degrees Fahrenheit.




Forest Farming Walnut Syrup (5 videos)


Mike Farrell, Cornell University’s maple specialist, points out the characteristics of walnut trees and demonstrates the tapping process. Unlike maple trees which are composed predominately of white sapwood, walnut trees quickly turn their sapwood into heartwood. Walnut trees can therefore be tapped at a younger age, before the sapwood turns to heartwood and diminishes the amount of sap that can be collected. Other differences between the two species are in the sap itself. Walnut sap has more pectin in it which makes it difficult to filter. It is also suggested that people with nut allergies should avoid walnut syrup until further research can be conducted on whether or not those allergenic properties are denatured during the boiling process.





 
Forest Trees

Forest Farming Seeds & Plant Stock

What kind of trees can be tapped for syrup?





Forest Farming Maple Syrup on a Small Scale (3 videos)


Steve Caccamo, President of Next Generation Maple Products, demonstrates maple sugaring for the backyard maple hobbyist. In this short series, we take a look at small-scale sap collection and evaporation. Steve collects sap from trees that are only a few miles from his home. After transporting the sap with his trailer, he boils it down in an evaporator in his backyard.




Forest Farming Maple Syrup on a Large Scale (12 videos)


Cornell University’s Director of the Uihlein Forest, Michael Farrell, takes us through the sugaring process step by step. First, we identify a sugar maple tree, then move to tapping and collecting the sap in three different ways. Michael explains the techniques and new technologies of large-scale sugaring operations all while delivering information that is valuable to a sugaring production on any scale. We finish this series with a look at tap hole maple, a previously undervalued forest product that is gaining new recognition for its exhibition of the character and stories behind the sugaring process.




Reverse Osmosis Process for Maple Syrup Production (5 videos)


Cornell University’s Maple Specialist, Steve Childs, explains the process of using reverse osmosis membranes with maple syrup production. Reverse osmosis membranes allow certain particles to pass through them while denying other particles. By putting maple sap under pressure and forcing it through the membrane, water molecules go through and are removed from the system while sugar molecules are left behind and are ejected back into the sap container. The sap is run through repeatedly and more water is removed with each pass through the RO membrane. The end result is concentrated sap that is then boiled in the evaporator until the sugar content reaches a minimum of 66 Brix (or percent) at 60 degrees Fahrenheit.




Forest Farming Walnut Syrup (5 videos)


Mike Farrell, Cornell University’s maple specialist, points out the characteristics of walnut trees and demonstrates the tapping process. Unlike maple trees which are composed predominately of white sapwood, walnut trees quickly turn their sapwood into heartwood. Walnut trees can therefore be tapped at a younger age, before the sapwood turns to heartwood and diminishes the amount of sap that can be collected. Other differences between the two species are in the sap itself. Walnut sap has more pectin in it which makes it difficult to filter. It is also suggested that people with nut allergies should avoid walnut syrup until further research can be conducted on whether or not those allergenic properties are denatured during the boiling process.





Other Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs)

What kind of trees can be tapped for syrup?





Forest Farming Maple Syrup on a Small Scale (3 videos)


Steve Caccamo, President of Next Generation Maple Products, demonstrates maple sugaring for the backyard maple hobbyist. In this short series, we take a look at small-scale sap collection and evaporation. Steve collects sap from trees that are only a few miles from his home. After transporting the sap with his trailer, he boils it down in an evaporator in his backyard.




Forest Farming Maple Syrup on a Large Scale (12 videos)


Cornell University’s Director of the Uihlein Forest, Michael Farrell, takes us through the sugaring process step by step. First, we identify a sugar maple tree, then move to tapping and collecting the sap in three different ways. Michael explains the techniques and new technologies of large-scale sugaring operations all while delivering information that is valuable to a sugaring production on any scale. We finish this series with a look at tap hole maple, a previously undervalued forest product that is gaining new recognition for its exhibition of the character and stories behind the sugaring process.




Reverse Osmosis Process for Maple Syrup Production (5 videos)


Cornell University’s Maple Specialist, Steve Childs, explains the process of using reverse osmosis membranes with maple syrup production. Reverse osmosis membranes allow certain particles to pass through them while denying other particles. By putting maple sap under pressure and forcing it through the membrane, water molecules go through and are removed from the system while sugar molecules are left behind and are ejected back into the sap container. The sap is run through repeatedly and more water is removed with each pass through the RO membrane. The end result is concentrated sap that is then boiled in the evaporator until the sugar content reaches a minimum of 66 Brix (or percent) at 60 degrees Fahrenheit.




Forest Farming Walnut Syrup (5 videos)


Mike Farrell, Cornell University’s maple specialist, points out the characteristics of walnut trees and demonstrates the tapping process. Unlike maple trees which are composed predominately of white sapwood, walnut trees quickly turn their sapwood into heartwood. Walnut trees can therefore be tapped at a younger age, before the sapwood turns to heartwood and diminishes the amount of sap that can be collected. Other differences between the two species are in the sap itself. Walnut sap has more pectin in it which makes it difficult to filter. It is also suggested that people with nut allergies should avoid walnut syrup until further research can be conducted on whether or not those allergenic properties are denatured during the boiling process.





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