Forest

Forest Farming Video Series

~Non-Timber Forest Products~

The suite of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) is quite vast but is contingent upon regional climate and forest type. These videos are meant to provide detailed information on a variety of NTFPs, including their natural ecosystem, methods of propagation, and harvest times. 

Forest Farming Webinar           Edibles          Medicinals           Syrups          

 

Craft & Decorations        Seeds & Plant Stock        Other NTFPs

Be sure to check out the rest of our forest farming videos on our YouTube channel.

 

Forest Farming Webinars

Non-timber Forest Product 2014 Webinar Series

 

Forest Farming Edibles

What kind of decorative & handcraft things can be grown?





Forest Products as Art – Making a Pine Needle Basket ~ 5 videos


Long leaf pine needles are the most prized when it comes to weaving pine needle baskets. The long leaf pine tree is typically found in the Southeast from the east coast of North Carolina to the Florida’s Gulf coast. Nancy Basket walks us through the steps of constructing a pine needle basket in this series. She instructs viewers to remember the term, “feed the end,” which refers to the feeding of more needles into the tail of the needles forming the basket. The long leaf pine needles require less feeding and are used more often in basketry because of this.





 

Forest Farming Medicinals

What are forest farmed medicinals?





Forest Farming Goldenseal Series ~ 6 videos


Herbalist Ben Kitchen explains what goldenseal is, where it grows best and how to plant it in the forest. Goldenseal is valued for its potent medicinal properties. It is ingested and used as a topical agent for its antimicrobial properties. Goldenseal can be propagated through rhizome division, seeds and fibers.




Forest Farming Ginseng Series ~ 5 videos


Ginseng expert, Bob Beyfuss, explains the different varieties of ginseng, how each variety is grown and the resulting value. We take a look at the forest types that ginseng prefers and note the herbaceous perennials that indicate whether the site is beneficial for growing ginseng or not. Bob explains how ginseng is planted in a wild-simulated situation and we take a look at the life cycle of ginseng.




Forest Farming Medicinal & Decorative Plants for Market Sale ~ 6 videos


Growing forest medicinal and decorative plants as nursery stock for market sale can often be more profitable than selling just the root. We take a look at the process of growing and transplanting seedlings for market sale with Robert Eidus, owner of Eagle Feather Organic Farm, and we review the importance of knowing your market and creating a business plan beforehand.




Methods of Ginseng Seed Collection & Stratification ~ 3 videos


Forest farmer, Dave Carmen, demonstrates some innovative ways to protect seed from mice, turkeys and insects. He experiments with ginseng plants that send up ripe seed berries early. By separating early seed from stratification with seed that ripens later in the season, he was able to bypass an entire year of the stratification process. Early seed was planted immediately and germinated the following spring instead of two springs later. Dave demonstrates the stratification process with ginseng seed which helps to protect the seed over the course of the first winter. By burying the seed with sand in a mesh bag, the seed stays moist and protected until the following year when it is dug up and washed for planting.





 

Forest Farming Syrups

Other Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs)





Forest Farming Pine Needle Raking & Baling ~ 8 videos


Associate Professor at Auburn University, Becky Barlow, identifies several different species of pine trees commonly found in the Southern US. We discuss various management techniques for pine forests, in particular longleaf pine forests which have adapted to fire. Managing your pine forest for woody undergrowth will assist with the raking of pine straw which occurs in January and February prior to spring landscaping. Finally, we take a look at a handmade pine straw baler used in small-scale, ecologically oriented pine straw production. This is a great tool for a landowner to begin baling pine straw for local sale at a farmers market.




Forest Farming Charcoal Production ~ 10 videos


Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Agent, Adam Downing, explains what to look for when harvesting wood for charcoal or firewood. Hardwood is more dense and makes a better quality charcoal while pine is lighter and burns hotter. Adam suggests marking desired trees during the summer while they are easier to identify and then returning during the cooler months to harvest the trees. Harvesting trees for charcoal can be done at any time of year, but allowing the cut timber adequate time to dry before burning in the kiln is critical. Allow trees to dry for a minimum of two months. When producing charcoal in a kiln, it’s important to protect your hands with insulated leather gloves. Leather gloves without insulation will not provide enough protection against the heat of the kiln. It’s also important to wear closed-toed shoes., preferably leather work boots. Kilns for charcoal production come in a variety of styles. A common feature of all kilns is the ability to control oxygen. The control of oxygen within the kiln is critical during the charcoal making process as is the ability to “close down the kiln”, i.e., shut off the flow of oxygen to finish the charring process. The kiln used in this demonstration requires a small fire at the base. A long stick placed in the center and protruding through a vent in the kiln allows access to the wood for initially lighting the fire after the kiln is fully loaded. The wood is packed/loaded as densely as possible to maximize the charcoal yield.





Forest Farming Crafts & Decor

 

What kind of decorative & handcraft things can be grown?





Forest Products as Art – Making a Pine Needle Basket ~ 5 videos


Long leaf pine needles are the most prized when it comes to weaving pine needle baskets. The long leaf pine tree is typically found in the Southeast from the east coast of North Carolina to the Florida’s Gulf coast. Nancy Basket walks us through the steps of constructing a pine needle basket in this series. She instructs viewers to remember the term, “feed the end,” which refers to the feeding of more needles into the tail of the needles forming the basket. The long leaf pine needles require less feeding and are used more often in basketry because of this.





 

Forest Farming Seeds & Plant Stock

Forest Farming Sustainable Seeds & Nursery Plants





Enchanter’s Garden Native Plant Series ~ 6 videos


Wild edible plants, medicinal herbs and decorative plants can all be grown under the forest canopy. In this series, we take a look at the different aspects of forest farming with woodland beds. Ian Caton and Peter Heus, Proprietor and Founder of Enchanter’s Garden in Hinton, West Virginia explain the differences in seed among various plant species. We look at different ways to propagate plants and discuss the problem of invasive species. Ian and Peter use controlled burns to eradicate invasive species and to improve forest conditions in favor of fire-dependent species like white or variegated milkweed. We also take a look at soil composition and review the steps to creating a healthy leaf compost.





Other Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs)

 

Other Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs)





Forest Farming Pine Needle Raking & Baling ~ 8 videos


Associate Professor at Auburn University, Becky Barlow, identifies several different species of pine trees commonly found in the Southern US. We discuss various management techniques for pine forests, in particular longleaf pine forests which have adapted to fire. Managing your pine forest for woody undergrowth will assist with the raking of pine straw which occurs in January and February prior to spring landscaping. Finally, we take a look at a handmade pine straw baler used in small-scale, ecologically oriented pine straw production. This is a great tool for a landowner to begin baling pine straw for local sale at a farmers market.




Forest Farming Charcoal Production ~ 10 videos


Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Agent, Adam Downing, explains what to look for when harvesting wood for charcoal or firewood. Hardwood is more dense and makes a better quality charcoal while pine is lighter and burns hotter. Adam suggests marking desired trees during the summer while they are easier to identify and then returning during the cooler months to harvest the trees. Harvesting trees for charcoal can be done at any time of year, but allowing the cut timber adequate time to dry before burning in the kiln is critical. Allow trees to dry for a minimum of two months. When producing charcoal in a kiln, it’s important to protect your hands with insulated leather gloves. Leather gloves without insulation will not provide enough protection against the heat of the kiln. It’s also important to wear closed-toed shoes., preferably leather work boots. Kilns for charcoal production come in a variety of styles. A common feature of all kilns is the ability to control oxygen. The control of oxygen within the kiln is critical during the charcoal making process as is the ability to “close down the kiln”, i.e., shut off the flow of oxygen to finish the charring process. The kiln used in this demonstration requires a small fire at the base. A long stick placed in the center and protruding through a vent in the kiln allows access to the wood for initially lighting the fire after the kiln is fully loaded. The wood is packed/loaded as densely as possible to maximize the charcoal yield.





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